They Would Think We Were Mad

August 19, 2010 |

The recent season four premiere of acclaimed television show “Mad Men” has been accompanied by a flurry of online activity about changes in marketing from the 1960’s to today.  Hubspot has detailed why Mad Men’s marketing strategies would fail if used today and advertising tips from the show’s main character, Don Draper, that still apply.  Here is a recap:

What has changed?

  1. Viewers now have the option to control which advertisements to which they expose themselves. They can skip commercials with TiVo, block pop-up advertisements online, or tune out radio ads with paid radio subscriptions.
  2. While all the rage in the 1960’s, consumers are no longer easily enamored by advertisements that illustrate power, wealth, and social status.  Instead, they want to be part of creating the messages themselves. Companies like Frito Lay and Heinz gave away the power when they let consumers submit advertising ideas, giving one lucky winner the chance to turn their idea into a national commercial.
  3. No longer does the consumer buying cycle end after a product is purchased; the conversation keeps going. Consumers write post-purchase reviews or discuss the brand in social media settings.  Marketers have realized the importance of this and have shifted efforts to better post-purchase interaction and create a well-respected trustworthy brand image. 

What is timeless?

  1. Knowing the customer and knowing what they want is still the first step to advertising. 
  2. Boiling down the message and getting to the point is still important. Consumers weren’t amused then and they aren’t amused now by wordy messaging.
  3. Using memorable imagery that strikes a chord with your audience is still a great way to engage consumers.  It can evoke emotion that makes a viewer take a second look and interpret the message on a different level.

(Photo Credit – mediumjones.com)

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